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Researching Current Issues in Instructional Technology, Fall 2017

Page history last edited by Steven V. Ervin 4 years, 5 months ago

Researching Current Issues in ITEC, Fall 2017

This page will be for the group project by the RCI class in Fall, 2017. You should leave the heading here and replace this text with whatever you need to make this project work. You should create extra pages to cover the topic that the class decides on.

 

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Exploring the Educational Significance of Virtual Reality

The use of virtual reality (VR) in education can be considered as one of the natural evolutions of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) or computer-based training (CBT). Use of computers as instructional aids has a long history going back to the early 1950s. Serious studies began in the early 1960s. Since the advent of the microcomputer in 1977, computers, particularly microcomputers or personal computers (PCs), have become a growing and recognized delivery system for many forms of education. Virtual reality, which can be used on all types of computers, has followed that trend (Pantelidis, 2009, p. 59). 

 

Virtual Reality is a three-dimensional, computer-generated, simulated environment where data is literally transformed into things we can see, feel, and even touch. Virtual reality has significant implications in many areas such as business, industry, entertainment, and most importantly for educators, education. We have a responsibility to learn more about this new technology and investigate uses for our students. Then we need to encourage the continuing research, development, and implementation of virtual reality environments for educational purposes (Rudin, 1995).


Contributors -

Steven Ervin, Beth Palmer, Halle Davis, Ann Walter, Lindsey Mitcheff, Olivia

 

Table of Contents -


 


Definition of Virtual Reality - 

Schroeder’s (2008) definition of virtual reality is “a computer-generated display that allows or compels the user (or users) to have a sense of being present in an environment other than the one they are actually in, and to interact with that environment” (p. 1). Educational platforms can be found in the areas of astronomy, medicine, music, literature, biology, history, mathematics, forensic science, ecology, and tourism, to name a few. Learners can gain a greater understanding of abstract concepts; they can improve their understanding by manipulating and scaling virtual objects or environments; and they can visit places that distance, time, or safety concerns would normally prohibit (Jackson & Fagan, 2000).

 

Basically, VR can be classified into two major types based on the level of interaction and immersive environment. In non-immersive virtual environment, computer simulation is represented on a conventional personal computer and is usually explored by keyboard, mouse, wand, joystick or touch screen. On the other hand, immersive VR environments are presented on multiple, room-size screen or through a stereoscopic, head-mounted display unit.  Special hardware such as gloves, suits and high-end computer systems might be needed in immersive VR environment. Lately, VR computer simulation has been defined as a highly interactive, 3-D computer generated program in a multimedia environment which provides the effect of immersion to the users (Lee & Wong, 2008, pgs. 232 - 233). 

 

   


The Benefits of VR in Modern Classrooms -

VR technology has advanced significantly and it can be utilized in almost every industry across the world. One great use for VR is in the classroom as it can provide students with enhanced learning experiences in an extremely creative way.  It can be applied to every subject from technology to academics. For example, VR can help students learn languages faster and can also break the language barrier in classrooms as virtual reality can be downloaded in any language (Hicks, 2016). 

 

Rapid advancements in computer technologies have resulted in virtual reality (VR) moving from military and training applications to new tools for education. For the first time, students can now experience a fully interactive 3 dimensional virtual reality system to explore and investigate science and engineering [5, 7, 8]. Today’s VR applications allow the user to see a projected virtual heart in 3 dimensions, feel it beat in real-time with a haptic stylus, cut into the heart and see the valves in action, and explore the movement of the heart with each beat while tracing cardiac blood flow. Virtual reality applications not only provide high quality graphic images and simulated movements but also have reached the point that these applications challenge educators to question the efficacy of physical objects and investigations compared to those created with virtual reality. (Jones, et. al., 2016, p. 15).

 

 

Chen (2009) indicated that the characteristics of virtual reality create an environment where learners interact with others, take an active role, have autonomy, participate in authentic real-world activities, and collaborate; which are all important constructivist learning activities.  Chen also notes that theoretical issues related to applying virtual reality in an educational setting have not been widely researched and presents an instructional design and development model to support the creation of virtual environments for educational use.

 

A further benefit of virtual reality in the classroom is how as an instructional tool it aligns well with constructivist learning principles.  Tiene and Ingram (2001) define constructivism as “an emphasis on students constructing their own sense of the world, their own perspectives on critical issues, their own professionalism in a fiend, and their own identity as learners,” where the learner’s role and initiative is critical to the educational process.  They note that the teacher becomes more of a facilitator in the constructivist classroom, guiding the students to explore, and asks questions and provides resources.  Key principles of constructivism include situated learning, scaffolding, and problem-based learning.  Interaction with the environment and social interactions are critical to the learning process.  Of course immersive virtual reality currently is not yet an easily acquired technology in classroom settings. Nevertheless, VEs are becoming more common place, and it is important to understand how this digital technology will aid the basic learning process (Bailenson, et. al., 2008, p. 103).

 

Finally, educational institutions are the place where most children decide what they want to be when they grow up. Virtual reality will help with this process as students can get a clear picture as to what each career path entails and if they would like it or not.  


Social Aspects of Virtual Reality - 

Virtual reality has been criticized as being “anti-social”.  As Shinal (2017) notes, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg believes the opposite, stating that virtual reality will ultimately be “social, with users sharing experiences across distances.”  Oculus executives also strongly believe that delivering on the social aspect of VR will ensure its mainstream appeal and adoption. 

 

Social VR apps are already being used for various interactive communities focused around gaming.  But as Strange (2017) notes, the use of social VR spaces is already expanding.  In these spaces that take the form of chat rooms, meetings, bars, or even game spaces for non-video games such as paintball or charades, early adopters of the technology are building communities.  Users are engaged with others via their avatar in an immersive, three-dimensional space through verbal, real-time interactions. 

 

Research by Williams (2016) indicates that the social aspects of a new technology matter more than anything else, and that the “content” is the engagement provided by the other users.  He also notes that for VR to find true mainstream acceptance and use, it must include a social aspect.

 

What are the potential implications of social VR in the classroom?  Will students of the near future log into their VR headset, a la Ernest Cline’s novel Ready Player One, and attend a virtual school where avatars create instructor presence, a real online community exists, and technology enhances social learning activities to prepare students for the information society?

 

For some concrete findings on this question, we can consider the research of Thorsteinsson and Page (2012) who investigated a virtual reality learning environment (VRLE) with a focus on collaborative learning.  Their findings indicate that social presence was an important part of using the learning environment, and helped build community among the students.  Informal interactions helped learners build familiarity with each other, and allowing the students to personalize their interface and environment of their virtual space helped them experience autonomy and drive engagement.

 

Being “together” and able to speak to the instructor and each other in the virtual space was found to have assisted the students in their learning.  Students also reported that they got more ideas when working collaboratively inside the virtual space and felt they could easily share information, receive feedback, brainstorm, and find solutions with their classmates. 

 

Mathieson and Leafman (2014) found that establishing social presence in current online learning environments is a critical challenge for teachers and educators, and that research indicates student perception of social presence is linked to satisfaction with a learning experience.  Today’s learning management systems facilitate the building of social communities in a variety of both synchronous and asynchronous ways such as text communication via instant messaging or discussion boards, videos for content or live chats, etc. 

 

If virtual reality becomes a standard part of the future classroom, social presence will still be a critical part of relationships and communications between students and instructors and students-to-students.

 

How might social presence change in a virtual reality setting with the addition of immersive 3D interactions and avatars instead of message boards?

 

Technology companies are hard at work developing “digital humans” for consumer-focused companies to utilize in customer service interactions (Captain, 2017).  These avatars are being designed to have incredibly lifelike faces, voices, and even “emotions”.  Future goals for business support avatars include the ability to discern the tone in a customers voice, interpret facial expressions, and “humanize” the written and verbal language style used.  The progress of commercial avatars will set the foundation for potential educational avatar use in the virtual reality enhanced classroom which supports the goal of social presence in an online learning environment.

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On the flip side, I believe adolescents and adults alike through computers, smart phones, and virtual reality devices sometimes get completely cut off from society. Using these devices significantly affects their social and interpersonal skills. However, virtual reality devices can be impeccable educational tools in guiding and motivating children. Despite the potential negative effects of virtual reality devices on the society, controlled and responsible application will favor the society in countless ways. As virtual reality is becoming an imperative part of the daily lives of millions of individuals across the world, our society will need to face its positive and negative repercussions (Kim, 2015).

 

More importantly, online programs that introduce dangerous simulated worlds to individuals by taking them to a virtual world filled with evils may alter their perception of the real world in a depraved way. No one can deny the fact that virtual reality can be a good educational tool that makes learning an interesting experience for children. For example, through watching YouTube with high resolution headsets children can join Norwegian forest officials for a virtual tour to explore the marine ecosystem of the country (BBC Earth). This powerful virtual education tool can redefine teaching by helping to create young scientist. Virtual reality devices can positively impact society as VR has applications in psychological therapy and other brain disorders. For instance, scientists at the University of Southern California have developed a therapy that places patients in simulation environments and helping them overcome fear (Howell, 2017).

 

In conclusion, virtual reality devices have a lot of possibilities and threats for our society. Therefore, it is up to society to make the most of the possibilities by overcoming the negative aspects.

 

  

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Social Aspects of Virtual Reality in the Classroom

 

            The use of virtual reality technology in the classroom has both advantages and disadvantages, however, the new generations are likely to immensely gain from its educational possibilities that are very exciting. One of primary social aspect is the elimination of language barriers which has always been an issue in education (Harbridge, 2017). With the use of this technology, every language can be incorporated in the software eliminating language which is a common social barrier (Hicks, 2016). Socially, student’s engagement is also improved greatly through the visualization abilities of the virtual reality technology.

 

            The possibilities of virtual reality in the classroom socially are numerous making education highly interactive in the virtual setup. Students can meet other learners studying the same content make it more fun through meaningful engagements. Every subject matter in school requires a considerable amount of social interaction; the virtual reality use in classroom promotes a wider scope of interpersonal relationships that are beneficial to the learners (Schuster, 2017). Indeed, learners can engage with their teachers, instructors, and other staff and ensure every aspect of learning is understood.

 

            In conclusion, virtual reality in the classroom creates a wide range of opportunities for the learners socially promoting learning not only in real time but also a more interactive learning environment. It is therefore an innovative approach towards education that suits the contemporary and rapidly evolving needs of students. Through this technology students realize their full potential while at the same time making them socially competent in world that is highly competitive holistically. The social aspects of virtual reality in classroom are entirely improved and students can evidently accomplish much more through the use of this innovative technology.

 

  


Side Effect Concerns -

Virtual education learning environments provide opportunities for students to interact and collaborate with other students from all over the world, work on real life projects, and use the information available on the web to search for answers, and engage in on-going learning (Kumar, Kumar & Basu, 2001, p. 401). However, some educators are skeptical of this form of technology in the classroom because it can literally make some users sick.  

 

Watch your students with epilepsy or seizures in their medical history. Virtual reality sickness (Cybersickness) occurs when exposure to a virtual environment causes symptoms that are like motionsickness symptoms. The most common symptoms are general discomfort, headache, stomach awareness, nausea, vomiting, sweating, fatigue, drowsiness, and disorientation. The statistics report also that many people experience stress after wearing virtual reality devices for many minutes. Virtual reality is widely used in everyday life, and people should be safe when using virtual reality devices. While many researchers do not address negative health impacts of VR devices, this industry should improve technical elements to make them safer if possible. Currently, they are associated with stress related sickness, physical injuries, and negative impact on the eyes and brain.

 


 

Additionally, aside from potential physical side affects as noted above, it will be important for educators who utilize virtual reality technology in the classroom to be mindful of the amount of time spent doing so.  Sullivan (2017) shared statistics from online data firm ComScore says we’re currently spending 2 hours and 51 minutes on our existing technology devices every day, and that eMarketer says we spend 4 hours and 5 minutes.  And while social virtual reality spaces are not in mainstream use yet, but Strange (2017) notes that platform Bigscreen claims its avid users are in the app for 20 to 30 hours a week. 

 

 

As technology continues to become more and more integrated in our lives, it will be important to maintain a balance between our digital and analog selves.  Educators in turn will need to find ways to both harness the power of VR where appropriate while still also relying on the human factor of teaching to provide the best learning experience for their students.


Accessibility Concerns -   

 

Cost
According to Becker et al. (2017), there is currently a lack of digital equity in access to technology in today’s classroom.  Without even considering worldwide statistics, in the United States alone, more than 30 million Americans lack access to high speed Internet.  Digital equity is still unbalanced in our country, and in the classroom as well. 

 

For a relevant and current classroom example related to cost, we can consider mobile technology.  Mobile technology is at this point ubiquitous in our society for various personal, business, and social uses.  It is also gaining traction as a potential learning tool in academic settings for a variety of beneficial characteristics such as personalized, flexible, portable, etc.  However, there are still key barriers to use in a school setting, the biggest of which is differentiated access of learners to the technology.  As Shuler (2009) explains, students in a classroom will have an incredibly diverse range of mobile technologies available to them.  This may range from a learner who is not allowed to have a mobile phone, to a learner with an older model phone, to a learner with the very latest phone on the market.  This highly varied range presents a challenge to an instructor considering the use of mobile devices in learning activities, unless the school system provides each student with the same mobile phone for classroom use. 

 

The potential for the digital divide to widen increases when we consider virtual reality.  Here again, the biggest barrier to mainstream adoption is cost-related, especially as users would need to have access to a smart phone as an entry point to using the actual virtual reality headsets.  With prices ranging from $30 for basic Google Cardboard to $600 for Oculus Rift headsets, the cost is prohibitive for the average public school system to invest in when there is currently limited educational content to justify the expense.  Private or charter schools may be an option to lead the way in developing a VR model for the classroom due to their higher degree of flexibility in developing educational experiences and potentially larger budget (Mann, 2016). 

 

Another potential option to increase the use of virtual reality in the classroom is through partnerships between technology providers and schools, as Google has done by offering field trip software called Expeditions and Cardboard headsets to schools for free.  While not really altruistic on the part of corporations since this allows them to gain access to educational settings for future growth and product placements, it at least serves to get VR introduced into the landscape of technology tools available for use in schools (Statt, 2015).  

 

Technological Literacy

One way to define technological literacy is “the learnt ability to gain and combine technical know-how together with other forms of social and cultural understanding to identify and qualify opportunities for the deployment, use and application of new and disruptive technologies within a professional context” (Technucation).

 

Beyond possessing their own technological literary, educators also must build into curriculums and learning environments the 21st century skills such as using technology to connect with others, create content, and collaborate as noted by Becker et al. (2017) When we consider technology that is now a part of everyday life, such as computers or the Internet, the majority of teachers are comfortable incorporating them into classroom learning activities to enhance their instructional practices and support the development of these 21st century competencies.  But as new technology emerges on a faster basis, can teachers keep up?  If they have little exposure to using virtual reality in their personal lives, is it realistic to expect they will have a comfort level and technological literacy to utilize VR in the classroom to support their instructional goals?  As Pantelidis (2009) noted, key challenges to using VR include learning how to use the hardware and software from a technical standpoint, as well as how to incorporate it in a way that is appropriate to enhance instructional objectives. 

 

Additionally, while research by Carver (2016), indicates that the actual availability of equipment itself can be the main factor impacting a teachers’ decision to incorporate a specific technology into their classroom (tying back to the barrier of cost), knowing how the technology could be used to enhance instruction was the next concern.  Fernandez, (2017) also notes that a key barrier to the use of new technology is not only that teachers have not been trained how to utilize VR, but also their “human reluctance” to change by learning about and adopting new tools or methods to apply in the classroom. The personal motivation to increase one’s own technological literary may be as much of a barrier as anything else. 


Educators' Perceptions of VR in Classrooms -

 

Virtual reality has been viewed as one of the most important technological advancements in our current time. However, this type of technology is not just being used for gaming and amusement, as it can now be used for educational purposes. Educators have different perceptions when it comes to VR’s applicability in education.

 

Educators are now getting more engaged in technological advancement, which enhances their teaching methods while increasing the learners’ interests toward a certain subject. For instance, an educator from Hunters Lane High School stated that the application of VR inside the classroom enhances the students’ participation and reduces their distraction (AMD, n.d.) Many educators view this type of technology as something that will help them in getting the students’ attention during the classroom discussion. That is because, the discussion itself has been turned into an interactive classroom session, which helps the students in the learning process. In 2016, a survey was conducted, which shows that more than sixty percent of the educators are interested to apply the VR into their classroom session, despite that only two percent of them have actually used the technology. According to Business Wire (2016), the survey reveals that 93 percent of the educators across the United States are interested to use the VR technology and grasp an awareness that it will bring more excitement to their students. This only shows that more and more educators are becoming open in terms of applying technology into their daily teaching approach. Also, they think that through virtual reality, is a different kind of classroom experience can add value to classrooms.

 

Educators should not limit their capabilities to teach their students. In fact, they should take advantage of all technological advancements that will help them improve their competence while improving the students’ participation. 

 

  


Students' Perceptions of VR in Classrooms -

 

Much focus has been placed on how virtual reality affects instructional practices, potential benefits to its use, and the impact on educators.  But what about the students?  Bicen and Ball (2016) studied how augmented reality affected student opinions. Their research suggests that augmented reality affects student opinions and perceptions of the educational experience in a positive way.  More specifically, students mentioned using augmented reality allowed them to:  use their imagination better, understand course material more easily, have greater autonomy, feel more motivated, and that the educational experience was more enjoyable overall. 

 

Mayrose (2012) found that student engagement and preference were higher in an interactive virtual reality learning environment.  He found that students were more motivated in the immersive and active learning environment that VR facilitates versus the more passive setting of direct instruction, though he suggests that further research is needed to establish the impact on learning and retention. 

 

Mayrose’s results also indicated that students preferred the VR lessons to the non-VR lessons in the study at a statistically significant rate, and suggests that they provide a richer, more interactive, and engaging learning environment than conventional teaching methods. 

 

 


Using Virtual Reality to Educate Future Educators - 

 

Technological advancements have necessitated a pedagogical paradigm shift from “teaching” to “learning” and from the traditional “teacher-centered” to a constructivist “student-centered” teaching approach. Traditionally, the instructor’s role was to transfer knowledge to the students and the primary method of delivering the course content was lectures and handouts. The very concept of teaching is changing from knowledge dissemination to knowledge creation (Leidner and Jarvenpaa, 1995) and the instructor is not considered the sole source of knowledge rather a facilitator of students’ learning (Kumar, Kumar & Basu, 2001, p. 401). 

 

In recognizing this shift from more traditional teaching environments, to more student-centered environments, how can VR aide in teacher development?  One way is through a program called TLE Teach LivE.

 

TLE Teach LivE is a mixed-reality classroom with simulated students that provides future teachers an opportunity to develop their teaching skills in a safe environment. One advantage of the TLE Teach LivE program is that it provides a safe environment that doesn’t place real students at risk of having an inexperienced teacher. In the TLE Teach LivE lab pre-service walk into a room that looks exactly like a normal classroom, but the students are avatars. Another advantage of this lab is the avatars act like both typically and atypically developing students. Therefore, pre-service teachers have opportunities to interact with students at different developmental and skill levels within one classroom” setting.  Future teachers are able to provide scaffolding or small group practice in a variety of grade levels and content areas. Furthermore, in an environment like TLE Teach LivE pre-service teachers can learn and practice classroom management skills with less pressure. For example, students may pull out their cell phones, shout out, etc. TLE Teach LivE was originally developed by the University of Central Florida and is being used in over 85 universities across the United States of America (TLE Teach LivE, 2017). For more information on this innovative way of educating future teachers please visit :http://teachlive.org/

 

The video below was created by the University of Mississippi and shows how the TLE Teach LivE program is being used by pre-service teachers at the university. 

 

 


The Future of Virtual Reality Trends in Education -

The future of VR trends is dependent on advancements in technology and the ability to economically bring that technology into the classroom.  Less than 1% of home computers have the high-end graphic cards necessary for the full immersive experience or the capabilities to wirelessly run the large files necessary (Dredge, 2016).  Technology projections suggest that home computers will be up to the task by 2020 (Smith, 2015) but, adding to the challenge, is the reality that a majority of VR material is accessed via smartphones.  Present smartphone technology is not advanced enough to render high quality experiences (Morphy, 2017).  As technologies advance, the mainstreaming will be dependent on developers ability to produce multi-platform content (Morphy, 2017).

 

It is worth mentioning that educators at all levels of education are slowly realizing and embracing the use of technology in the classroom. Notably, education is one of the fields that has held on to outdated methods and ways for far too long. However, through technological and digital transformation, the education sector has begun making drastic changes in the physical make-up of the class, instruction and assessment. The current trends have a significant positive impact on student learning because it has succeeded in making learning collaborative and interactive.

 

(VR) virtual reality can bring the outside world into the classroom. It has applications that allow students to view what they are learning using their technology devices and machines. As a result, they increase their visual literacy, attention to the audience, and technology literacy. Thus, there is an endless possibility of technology transforming the classroom in the near future (Newman, 2017). To make this possible, there has been an increase in the number of computers in the classroom unlike in the past where students had to gather in a computer lab to access a desktop computer.

 

Additionally, virtual reality devices are expected to increase significantly in the future. The reason is that apart from making learning interactive and fun, it also provides other services that are fun and engaging such as gaming and other educational applications that help students in the learning process. Furthermore, learning is filled with imaginative activities where students are forced to make mental images from what they learn. Therefore, virtual reality devices will help the students experience and see rather than just imagine (Hreha, 2016). Also, the future of virtual reality in education will involve giving the young people in the society a chance to experience learning more aggressively than with a text book.

 

To conclude this discussion, virtual reality has had a significant impact on the education sector. Although it was not readily accepted in the education sector like in other technologies, it has recently been embraced and has positively impacted learning in the classroom and industry. The use of Virtual Reality (VR) is expected to grow in schools and industry in the future. 


Resources for Educators 

Educators all over the world are using virtual reality to give their students meaningful learning opportunities. For example, students are able to attend international field trips all through the use of virtual reality. These field trips allow students to “travel” to foreign countries and experience different cultures via virtual reality. In an article titled Virtual Reality: Low-Cost Tools and Resources for the Classroom Brown and Green discuss different low cost virtual reality tools and materials for educators to use. Here Brown and Green make mention of Matel View Finder, Google’s Street View App, and many other virtual reality tools that do not cost a lot (2016).

 

Furthermore,  another thing educators are utilizing virtual reality for are Virtual Field Trips. Virtual Field Trips are being used to give students the experience of attending an international field trip, but without the cost that comes alone with an international trip. In an article titled International Field Trips: a new direction the authors discuss the idea of virtual field trips and give a wonderful virtual field trip list of resources on page 258.

 

Virtualrealityforeducation.com has hyperlinks to many different types of virtual reality resources for educators. This website includes hyperlinks to virtual reality websites, apps, and news. This website could be used as a starting point for educators wanting to learn ways to incorporate virtual reality into their curriculums and classrooms. In addition, this site could be used for educators to create plans for what resources they will utilize to incorporate virtual reality into student learning.

 

  


 

Works Cited -

 

3 Ways Virtual Reality Can Enhance Learning educause: Published on Aug 8, 2016: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRQzl8ewDMQ

 

AMD. (n.d.) VR in the Classroom. Retrieved November 15, 2017, from: http://www.amd.com/en-us/who-we-are/corporate-responsibility/technology/vr-in-the-classroom

 

Bailenson, J., Yee, N., Blascovich, J., Beall, A., Lundblad, N. & Jin, M. (2008). The Use of Immersive Virtual Reality in the Learning Sciences: Digital Transformations of Teachers, Students, and Social Context. Stanford University. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 17: 102–141. http://www.life-slc.org/docs/Bailenson_etal-immersiveVR.pdf

 

BBC Earth. (2017). 360° Norwegian Kelp Forest Soundscape Our Blue Planet – BBC Earth. YouTube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfLcjWq6m9o

 

Becker, S., Cummins, M., Davis, A., Freeman, A., Giesinger, C., and Ananthanarayanan, V. (2017). NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

 

Best Educational Google Cardboard and Virtual Reality Apps: Teacher's Tech: Published on Apr 8, 2016: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjJygzlJJDg&list=PLmkaw6oRnRv9oyHG987l5fNdUgWB5S0Gh

 

Bicen, H., and Ball, E.  (2016).  Determination of student opinions in augmented reality.  World Journal on Educational Technology: Current Issues, 8, 205-209.  Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1141852.pdf

 

Brown, A., & Green, T. (2016). Virtual Reality: Low-Cost Tools and Resources for the  Classroom. Techtrends: Linking Research & Practice To Improve Learning, 60(5), 517-519. doi:10.1007/s11528-016-0102-

 

Business Wire. (2016). Survey Finds Teachers Want to Make Virtual Reality a Reality in theClassroom. Retrieved November 15, 2017, from: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160627005621/en/Survey-Finds-Teachers-Virtual-Reality-Reality-Classroom

 

Can VR help create empathy around climate change? | Jeremy Bailenson: TED Archive  Published on Dec 22, 2016: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJCD3R3LlSs

 

Captain, S.  (2017).  “This Chatbot is Trying Hard to Look and Feel Like Us.”  FastCompany.com.  Retrieved from  https://www.fastcompany.com/40495681/this-chatbot-is-trying-hard-to-look-and-feel-like-us

 

Carver, L. (2016).  Teacher perception of barriers and benefits in K-12 technology usage.  The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 15, 110 – 116.  Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1086185.pdf

 

Chen, C.  (2009).  Theoretical bases for using virtual reality in education.  Themes in Science and Technology Education, 2, 71- 90.  Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1131320.pdf

Cline, E. Ready Player One. Random House Inc., 2011.

 

Dredge, S. (2016, January 7). Three really real question about the future of virtual reality. Retrieved Nov 14, 2017, from The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jan/07/virtual-reality-future-oculus-rift-vr

 

Designing for virtual reality and the impact on education | Alex Faaborg | TEDxCincinnati, 2015 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQMA5NNhN58

 

Early lessons learned from Google Expeditions Published on May 20, 2016 Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuceLtGjDWY

 

Fernandez, M.  (2017).  Augmented virtual reality: How to improve education systems.  Higher Learning Research Communications, 7, 1-15.  Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1150087.pdf

 

Harbridge, S. (2017). Virtual Reality in the Classroom – The Benefits and the Barriers. Retrieved From: https://www.teachwire.net/news/virtual-reality-in-the-classroom-the-benefits-and-the-barriers

 

Hasse, C, & Wallace, J.  (2015).  Technological Literary.  Technucation.  Retrieved from http://technucation.dk/en/concepts/technological-literacy/

 

Hicks, P. (2016). The Pros and Cons of Using Virtual Reality in the Classroom. Retrieved from: https://elearningindustry.com/pros-cons-using-virtual-reality-in-the-classroom

 

Hicks, P. (2016, December 13). The Pros and Cons Of Using Virtual Reality In The Classroom. Retrieved October 04, 2017, Retrieved from:  https://elearningindustry.com/pros-cons-using-virtual-reality-in-the-classroom

 

Hreha, J. (2016). Virtual reality is our savior: A vision of the future of education. Retrieved from: http://bigthink.com/wikimnd/virtual-reality-is-our-savior-

     a-vision-of-the-future-of-education

 

Howell, K. (2017). Remarkable Ways Virtual Reality is Improving Society. Epics in IEEE. Retrieved from: http://epics.ieee.org/remarkable-ways-virtual-reality-improving-society/ 

 

Jones, M.G., Hite, R., Childers, G., Corin, E., Pereyra, M., Chesnutt, K., Goodale, T. (2016). Teachers’ and Students’ Perceptions of Presence in Virtual Reality Instruction. Department of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education, North Carolina State University. http://www.wseas.us/e-library/conferences/2015/Salerno/EDU/EDU-01.pdf

 

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Mann, E. (2016).  Is virtual reality ready for school?  Brown Center Chalkboard.  Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brown-center-chalkboard/2016/09/08/is-virtual-reality-ready-for-school-2/

 

Mathieson, K., & Leafman, J. (2014)  Comparison of Student and instructor perceptions of social presence.  Journal of Educators Online, 11, 1 – 27.  Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1033262.pdf

 

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Morphy, E. (2017, November 13). Managing Virtual and Augmented Reality Assets as Content. Retrieved from CMS Wire: https://www.cmswire.com/digital-experience/managing-virtual-and-augmented-reality-assets-as-content/

 

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Pretty Curious - 360° Virtual Reality - STEM Careers of the Future: EDF Energy Published on Jan 17, 2017: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3Dakpctg3o&list=PLEzanxWmzW8Ns074fNwswpplYmDjw9qIc

 

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Comments (14)

Steven V. Ervin said

at 10:53 pm on Oct 4, 2017

The principal advantage students in a classroom will have is that they will be able to explore and discover any corner of the world,
any technology, and work-related training experience right from their desk. This should possibly help focus are topic in discussion.
What do you ponder?

Steven V. Ervin said

at 11:03 pm on Oct 4, 2017

Educational Institutions are also the place where most children decide what they want to be when they grow up. Virtual reality will help with this
process as students can get a clear picture as to what each career path entails and if they would like it or not. It can be applied to every subject
from technology to academics. For example, VR can help students learn languages faster and can also break the language barrier in classrooms
as virtual reality can be downloaded in any language (Hicks, 2016).

References
Hicks, P. (2016, December 13). The Pros and Cons Of Using Virtual Reality In The Classroom. Retrieved October 04, 2017, Retrieved from;
https://elearningindustry.com/pros-cons-using-virtual-reality-in-the-classroom

Steven V. Ervin said

at 11:06 pm on Oct 4, 2017

VR technology has advanced significantly and it can be utilized in almost every industry across the world. One great use for
VR is in the classroom as it can provide students with enhanced learning experiences in an extremely creative way.

Steven V. Ervin said

at 8:02 pm on Oct 6, 2017

Watch your students with epilepsy or seizures in their medical history. Virtual reality sickness (Cybersickness) occurs when exposure to a virtual environment
causes symptoms that are like motion sickness symptoms. The most common symptoms are general discomfort, headache, stomach awareness, nausea,
vomiting, sweating, fatigue, drowsiness, and disorientation. The statistics report also that many people experience stress after wearing virtual reality devices
for many minutes. To sum up, virtual reality is widely used in everyday life, and people should be safe when using virtual reality devices. While many researchers
do not address negative health impacts of VR devices, this industry should improve technical elements to make them safer if possible. Currently, they are associated
with stress related sickness, physical injuries, and negative impact on the eyes and brain.

Beth Palmer said

at 7:13 pm on Oct 16, 2017

Not sure how to use this site, so this is a "test" comment.

Steven V. Ervin said

at 1:15 pm on Oct 27, 2017

Directions for using our Wiki is located on HTTPS://my.pbworks.com.

Steven V. Ervin

Steven V. Ervin said

at 12:14 am on Nov 10, 2017

Steven Ervin
Pbworks “How to” Files
COLLAPSE
http://michamps.pbworks.com/f/student_guide.pdf

http://kentcohort1.pbworks.com/f/wiki.pdf

Here are (2) links to pdf Pbworks “How to” Files.

Hope this helps,

Steven V. Ervin

hdavis18@... said

at 11:31 am on Nov 4, 2017

VR technology is being used in industry to train employees when time consuming, expensive training/testing isn't conceivable such as in hazmat, fire, and police training as well as surgical. VR eliminates "risk from training and testing by creating safe, predictable and well-equipped environments in which to learn new skills."

Landrum, S. (2017, July 27). 4 Ways Virtual Reality Is Revolutionizing The Workplace. Forbes. Retrieved Nov 11 from https://www.forbes.com/sites/sarahlandrum/2017/07/27/4-ways-virtual-reality-is-revolutionizing-the-workplace/2/#547e3cc76042

Beth Palmer said

at 1:37 pm on Nov 12, 2017

Hi Classmates,
I took a stab at organizing the structure of our wiki with a few headers. Please feel free to add your research of this topic under any of the headers. Also, if you feel additional headers are needed, please add. NOTE: Don't forget to add your references in alphabetical order/APA format under the works cited page -- so that we don't have to go back and rearrange later.
Thanks!

hdavis18@... said

at 8:34 pm on Nov 13, 2017

beautiful!

lovers said

at 12:02 pm on Nov 19, 2017

Thanks so much Beth!

Steven V. Ervin said

at 3:56 pm on Nov 19, 2017

The Future of (VR) Virtual Reality Trends in Education
(VR) virtual reality can bring the outside world into the classroom. It has applications that allow students to view what they are learning using their technology devices and machines. As a result, they increase their visual literacy, attention to the audience, and technology literacy. Thus, there is an endless possibility of technology transforming the classroom in the near future (Newman, 2017). To make this possible, there has been an increase in the number of computers in the classroom unlike in the past where students had to gather in a computer lab to access a desktop computer.

Newman, D. (2017, July 18). Top 6 digital transformation trends in education. Retrieved from
https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielnewman/2017/07/18/top-6-digital-transformation-trends-in-education/

Steven V. Ervin said

at 4:15 pm on Nov 19, 2017

In 2016, a survey was conducted, which shows that more than sixty percent of the educators are interested to apply the VR into their classroom session, despite that only two percent of them have actually used the technology. According to Business Wire (2016), the survey reveals that 93 percent of the educators across the United States are interested to use the VR technology and grasp an awareness that it will bring more excitement to their students. This only shows that more and more educators are becoming open in terms of applying technology into their daily teaching approach.

Business Wire. (2016). Survey Finds Teachers Want to Make Virtual Reality a Reality in the
Classroom. Retrieved November 15, 2017, from
http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160627005621/en/Survey-Finds-Teachers-Virtual-Reality-Reality-Classroom

Steven V. Ervin said

at 4:16 pm on Nov 19, 2017

Great job on starting up the Wiki :)

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